First Song of The Year

(And it is already February)

Here is a new song called Walkabout.

Now wasn’t that fun?

Here is one you are sure to remember:

That was Chorale Number 81 by Bach, “Now That the Day Hath Reached Its Close.”

Finally, here are the first 8 bars of a work in progress called “Monotony.”

96 Songs

That’s right, folks. This is song number 96 in our countdown of 100 classical songs. It was written by Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and is titled Bridal Chorus. I wonder what they played at weddings before 1850? Perhaps some Bach? In any event, we now have just four songs to go and we will have explored 100 classical masterpieces together! Isn’t that exciting? I feel as if my musical knowledge has really increased during this project.

According to Wikipedia, The “Bridal Chorus” from the 1850 opera Lohengrin by German composer Richard Wagner, who also wrote the libretto, is a march played for the bride’s entrance at many formal weddings throughout the Western world. In English-speaking countries, it is generally known as “Here Comes the Bride” or “Wedding March”, but “wedding march” refers to any piece in march tempo accompanying the entrance or exit of the bride, notably Felix Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March”. Wagner’s piece was made popular when it was used as the processional at the wedding of Victoria the Princess Royal to Prince Frederick William of Prussia in 1858.

For more on that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridal_Chorus

PIANO

And here is Mendelssohn’s Wedding March. Now you have both songs ready in the event you are at a wedding and the keyboard player is out.

A New Song for the New Year

Happy New Year to you, from me and “The Cool Cats.”

Here is another song written by Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924), titled Un bel di vedremo. According to my online translater, that means “A lot of we’ll see.” Perhaps it again loses something in translation. It is from the opera Madam Butterfly, and it is song number 94 in the list of 100 classical songs. You know what that means, right? We only have six songs left, at which point I will have transcribed 100 Classical Masterpieces, and you will have heard them all.

THE COOL CATS SAY “HAPPY NEW YEAR!”

Another Hit

This song may be short, but it was a very complicated song to transcribe. It was written by Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924) and is titled O soave fanciulla, which means “O sweet girl.” (Isn’t that also a song by the Dave Clark Five?). It is song number 92 in the ongoing list of 100 classical songs. It is from the opera La Boheme.

Giacomo Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer known primarily for his operas. Regarded as the greatest and most successful proponent of Italian opera after Verdi, he was descended from a long line of composers, stemming from the late-Baroque era. Though his early work was firmly rooted in traditional late-19th-century Romantic Italian opera he later developed his work in the realistic verismo style, of which he became one of the leading exponents.

His most renowned works are La bohème (1896), Tosca (1900), Madama Butterfly (1904), and Turandot (1924), all of which are among the most frequently performed and recorded of all operas. And it was the opera Dan Aykroyd was going to see in the film “Trading Places” before he was set up by his employer and had his life taken over by Eddie Murphy.

“IT’S AN OPERA”

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