Three More Bach Chorales

Here are three more Bach Chorales. They are numbers 79, 80, and 81 from the book “101 Chorales by Johann Sebastian Bach.”

The entire list can be found here:

Number 79 – “Come, Follow Me, the Savior Spoke”

Number 80 – “The Star Proclaims the King is Here”

Number 81 – “Now That the Day Hath Reached Its Close”

Four More In The Books

Here are four chorales by Bach
In the music world, he is “The Rock”
The songs sound similar, this is true
But they’re sure to lift you if you’re blue

Number 73 – Oh, How Blessed are Ye Whose Toils Are Ended:

Number 74 – O God, Thou Faithful God:

Number 76 – All Praise to Jesus’ Hallowed Name:

Number 77 – In Thee, Lord, Have I Put My Trust:

These songs can be found, along with all of the other Bach Chorales, here:

Our Gift to You

Here are three more Chorales by Bach. I hope you enjoy them. They are chorale numbers 70, 71, and 72 from the songbook “101 Chorales by Johann Sebastian Bach.”

If you are using a smartphone to view this page, go to Desktop Mode in Chrome Settings (the three dots in the upper right corner) to use the music player. Then the songs can be played one after the other without needing to click the play button after every song.

Number 72 – Come Holy Ghost, Our Souls Inspire:

Number 71 – Blessed Jesus at Thy Word:

Number 70 – Beside Thy Manger Here I Stand

And here is something sure to brighten your day:

Three More Chorales

Here are three more Bach Chorales from the book “101 Bach Chorales.” The rest of them can be found here:

Number 67:

Number 68:

Number 69:

Here are two songs you are sure to remember. They were both written by Edvard Grieg, and were posted here last year around this time (before I knew how to do sound effects!)

Say Hello To My Little Friend

A Song For You

Here is a Renaissance song titled “See Man.” I will let you guess the name of the composer.
Here is a hint: If he were still alive he would be either 490 or 492 years old, depending on your source. The beginning of the song sounds a little like the theme from the original Star Trek.

Cool Hat

So That’s What Gymnopedie Means

This was one of the first songs I learned in the music program at school. It is titled “Gymnopedie No. 1” by Eric Satie. Most versions are slower than this, but since we all have busy schedules I gave it a quicker tempo.

Eric Alfred Leslie Satie (May 17, 1866 – July 1, 1925), who signed his name Erik Satie after 1884, was a French composer and pianist. He was the son of a French father and a British mother. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire, but was an undistinguished student and obtained no diploma. In the 1880s he worked as a pianist in cafĂ©-cabaret in Montmartre, Paris, and began composing works, mostly for solo piano, such as his GymnopĂ©dies. He also wrote music for a Rosicrucian sect to which he was briefly attached.

Eric Satie in 1920

Is it just me, or does this song sound similar?

https://youtu.be/fI4kPSO7CNA

Renaissance Fair

Here is a song by Orlando Di Lasso titled “Resonet in Laudibus.” That translates to “Let the Voice of Praise Resound.” Amen. By the way, do you know what the word “Amen” means? It means “So be it.”
This song was called “one of the chief Christmas songs of joy” in 1550. That accolade was then given to Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas” a mere 400 years later.

It is Finished

I have finished transcribing all 18 songs from the music book Piano Literature, Volume One. All of the songs were written in the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Contemporary eras.

The eight composers are as follows:

And here are the last five songs:

Dmitri Kabalevsky A Little Song:

Dmitri Kabalevsky Waltz:

Dmitri Shostakovich March:

Bela Bartok A Winter Tale:

Bela Bartok The Lonely Traveler:

More Songs Fresh off the Press

Here are some more songs from the book Piano Literature Volume One. Also, did you know that I lettered in three different sports in high school? They were all in lower case, however…..

Beethoven Sonatina in G:

Schumann The Merry Farmer:

Schumann Soldiers’ March:

Schumann The Wild Horseman:

Kabalevsky Dance:

Kabalevksy Quick March:

Piano Music

Here are some songs from a piano music book titled Piano Literature Volume One. Its $5.50 price has to be one of the best deals around. That’s around 30 cents per song.

I posted some of the songs yesterday using an organ, but I think they sound better on a piano. Hence the title.

There are 18 songs altogether, so be sure and check back later to hear the other songs. So far the reception has been tremendous, with downloads in the triple digits. Watch out, Google.

Beethoven Ecossaise in G
Mozart Minuet in F
Bach Minuet in G BWV 116
Bach March in D
Bach Minuet in G BWV 114
Bach Minuet in G Minor BWV 115
Spindler Sonatina

In the event you were wondering what BWV stands for, the Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV) is a catalogue of compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach. It was first published in 1950, edited by Wolfgang Schmieder. The catalogue’s second edition appeared in 1990. An abbreviated version of that second edition, known as BWV2a, was published in 1998.

Bach is Back

These songs were all written by Johann Sebastian Bach.

Minuet in G (BWV 116):

BWV 116

Minuet in G (BWV 114):

BWV 114

Minuet in G Minor (BWV 115):

BWV 115

March in D (BWV 122):

Sonatina by Spindler:

One of the readers asked what the letters “BWV” represented. The answer is as follows: The Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV) Bach works catalogue is a catalogue of compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach. It was first published in 1950, edited by Wolfgang Schmieder. The catalogue’s second edition appeared in 1990. An abbreviated version of that second edition, known as BWV2a, was published in 1998.

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