Renaissance Fair

Today’s song was written by Orlando Di Lasso. He was considered among Europe’s greatest musicians at the end of the 16th-century. It is titled “je laime bien et laimerai,” which translates to “I’ll be Fine and I’ll be Fine” according to translate.com. Really!

Orlando Di Lasso (also spelled Orlando De Lassus) was born in present-day Belgium in 1532 but traveled extensively throughout Italy as a singer and a student of composition. He composed more than 2,000 works in Latin, French, and German and in all genres of vocal music. (It is disturbing how much he looks like one of my music teachers!)

Orlando Di Lasso

If you would like to see the sheet music:
https://musescore.com/user/17829001/scores/6992380

Also, if you would like to help out a hero dog:

https://www.gofundme.com/f/hero-dog-saves-me-from-mountain-lion-attack?utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&utm_medium=email&utm_source=customer

More Music

We are half way through the list of 101 Chorales. Here are numbers 42, 45, and 46.

The first two songs begin in the key of G Major. The last song begins in the key of C-Minor. Can you hear the difference? I knew you could!

Number 42
Number 45
Number 46
“THIS MUSIC IS THE CAT’S MEOW!”

Three More Just for You

These three songs bring us up to number forty-one in the countdown of 101 Bach Chorales, for those of you keeping score at home.

Number 39
Number 40
Number 41

And by the way, if you haven’t seen the show “Halo” on Paramount Plus, I highly recommend it. But be prepared to have your mind blown.

https://www.paramountplus.com/shows/halo/

That’s a Wrap

Here are three more of those Bach Chorales everyone is talking about. Chorale Number 37 and 39 were written in 3/4 time, but the percussion is 4/4. It produces an interesting effect.

Do you ever experience writer’s block? If that happens to you, just remember to put one font in front of the other.

Number 36
Number 37
Number 38
Number 39
STARRY STARRY NIGHT

More Music

We are slowly making our way through the book of 101 Chorales by Johann Sebastian Bach. Here are chorale numbers 33 through 38. Download for free! (Now where else can you get such a great deal?)

Number 33
Number 34
Number 35
Number 36
Number 38
Photo from the Hubble Telescope

Name That Film

This song is from an Academy Award winning film. I’m pretty sure. In any event, I have been working on it all day and it’s time to get it out into the world.

It was written over 100 years ago by Scott Joplin. He was born on November 24, 1868 and he passed away on April 1, 1917. He was an American composer and pianist. He is also known as the “King of Ragtime” because of the fame achieved for his ragtime compositions, music that was born out of the African-American community.

During his brief career, he wrote over 100 original ragtime pieces, one ragtime ballet, and two operas. One of his first and most popular pieces, the “Maple Leaf Rag”, became ragtime’s first and most influential hit, and has been recognized as the archetypal rag. Joplin considered ragtime to be a form of classical music and largely disdained the practice of ragtime such as that in honky tonk.

For more on that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Joplin

Four More For The Road

The Countdown of Bach Chorales continues. You probably have noticed that the final chord is major, instead of minor, in most of these songs. When that happens it is called a “Picardy Third” because the third note on the final chord is raised a half step.

For more on that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picardy_third

Chorale Number 27
Chorale Number 28
Chorale Number 29
Chorale Number 32

More Renaissance Music

Here is another song by Orlando Di Lasso, titled “Matona Mia Cara.” I have seen different spellings of his last name; I am going with this one.

String Version
High Octane Version
Regular Version
Over The Top Version

And here are Bach Chorale Numbers 22 and 23:

If you would like to see the sheet music:

https://musescore.com/user/28092/scores/85314

Name That Tune. I’ll give you a hint. It’s Vivaldi! (Updated 5-18-2022)


I Just Love This Song…..

Renaissance Man

150 years before Bach was even born, music known as Counterpoint was being written by a man named Orlando di Lasso. This song is called Illumina Oculos Meos, which translates to “Enlighten my eyes lest I sleep in Death.” It has just four lines of music, the only flat is B-Flat, and the only sharps are F#, C#,and G#. He manages to go through many different key changes using only those four accidentals.

Traditional Instruments
Non-Traditional Instruments

Orlando di Lasso was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance. Along with Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina he is today considered to be the chief representative of the mature polyphonic style of the Netherlands school, and he was the most famous and influential musician in Europe at the end of the 16th century.

Compare that to this Bach Chorale:

Number 21 of 100

I love Bach’s music, but I have to admit (or do I?) that I find Counterpoint to be much more interesting than a chorale. Maybe that is because Chorales were written so that just regular people could sing them in church. What’s that? I’m preaching to the choir, you say?

If you are interested in learning more about the rules of counterpoint, check this out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counterpoint#First_species

Orlando di Lasso was born in Mons in the province of Hainaut, in what is today Belgium. Information about his early years is minimal, although some uncorroborated stories have survived, the most famous of which is that he was kidnapped three times because of the singular beauty of his singing voice. At the age of 12 he left the Low Countries with Ferrante Gonzaga and went to Mantua, Sicily, and later Milan (from 1547 to 1549). While in Milan he made the acquaintance of the madrigalist Hoste da Reggio, an influence which was formative on his early musical style. According to the dates listed below, this song would be considered a Renaissance Music composition.

Musical Periods: The History of Classical Music

  • Medieval (1150 – 1400)
  • Renaissance (1400 – 1600)
  • Baroque (1600 – 1750)
  • Classical (1750 – 1820)
  • Romantic (1820 – 1900)

    Here is a painting that is around the same age as this music (not scary at all….):
Dante Alighieri by Domenico di Michelino.

For more on the Renaissance Composer: https://bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Lasso-Orlando.htm

For more on the Renaissance Artist: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domenico_di_Michelino

The Hits Are Back

3/4 Time

And here are some thoughts I thought worth sharing:
– Did you know that before I became a vegetarian I was in “Burgers and Acquisitions?”
– Do you like ambience? Take an ambien.
– I am a guitar player, which means I often fret.
– Even thugs sometimes need hugs.

– Nipples always come in pairs. You can’t have one without the udder.

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